“Discussions With Teachers” – Introduction

If you have never read one of Steiner’s lectures, you are in for a treat with this series of discussions for teachers.  You can find this lecture series for FREE here (audio) and for FREE here (written).

One of the things I find fascinating about Waldorf Education is that it grew out of a particular time and place and for a specific set of children – it was education for the children of the factory employees at the Waldorf-Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Germany in 1919.  I often wonder what kind of indications Rudolf Steiner would give for homeschoolers today, living in our place and time – would it be totally different indications?   These lectures, to me, provide a key to answering this question by providing a framework for modern education (which is why I think these indications grew from specific indications for children of factory employees in early twentieth-century Germany into a hundred-year-old world-wide educational initiative!).

The other fascinating thing is that the teachers that opened the first Waldorf school had only TWO WEEKS of training.  That should calm your nerves about hoemschooling right?  The lectures compiled in “Discussions With Teachers” were part of the first Waldorf Teacher Training.  There is a lot of talk on the Internet about being prepared for homeschooling and the pressure Waldorf homeschoolers have to not only homeschool but make it “Waldorf enough” – well, here is your training course, FREE for your use!

Despite all the dogma surrounding Waldorf Education and Waldorf  homeschooling on the Internet, Rudolf Steiner’s method was to “elicit a lesson from the teacher temselves, and only then to make his own contribution based on what was presented” (from the Introduction).  He essentially laid out four principles for teachers:

The teacher must have initiative in everything that is done

The teacher should be interested in the whole world and of all of humanity

The teacher must never make a compromise in heart or mind with what is not true.

The teacher must never grow stale or sour.

In these lectures, Steiner also provided speech exercises to improve a teacher’s effectiveness. Wouldn’t we all like to be more effective in teaching our children?  These lectures look at this in detail, along with many other practical indications for teaching. Please do follow along with me!

Many blessings,

Carrie

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2 thoughts on ““Discussions With Teachers” – Introduction

  1. Started reading/listening to it – thanks for the prompt, Carrie. Only on first lecture but I am already finding it intriguing especially the bit on temperaments.

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