Simplicity Monday: Doing

Just for today, I will be a “do-er”.

I will put away my computer, phone, email, Facebook and be present with my children.

I will stop researching parenting styles, homeschooling curriculum or other outside advice, and look inside myself to see what is right for my own family.   I will talk about this with my spouse and together we will work toward our own family culture.

I will work in my home and show my children how to do practical things.

I will involve my whole family in working in our home in a caring way.

I will have fun with my family and do things that will create memories.

I will initiate and take the time to sustain doing real physical exercise and inner work.

I will include myself and my needs as part of the family and show my family that I am a person as well by doing something for myself, even if that just means taking the time to do my hair and put on clothes that fit.

I will take the time to go to a place of worship if that has been calling me; instead of listing all the reasons why I cannot do that.

I will go to bed at a reasonable hour.

If I am feeling sad or blue, I will do something nice for myself and also something nice for someone else.

I will plan my day tomorrow and actually do things, even if it is not perfect.

I will dream big and I will do.

Many blessings,

Carrie

Simplicity Monday: Slow Sundays

One way to simplify your week is to use my “X” method on your calendar, (see this link http://theparentingpassageway.com/2013/07/29/simplicity-monday-days-of-xs/ )

and then to be sure to mark all of your Sundays as “Slow Sundays”.  Well, my day is Sunday, in large part due to our religion, but your day might be a Slow Friday or a Slow Saturday.

What this will look like will be up to you, but I suggest you follow the same rhythm each week.  For example, Continue reading

Simplicity Monday: Too Much Stuff

This was a great post over at the Simplicity Parenting blog regarding the effects of de-cluttering a child’s room and eliminating the “too much stuff” syndrome:  http://www.simplicityparenting.com/what-happened-when-i-simplified-our-lives/

In the United States, particularly here in the Deep South, children Continue reading

Simplicity Monday: Days of “X”’s

If you look at my calendar, you will see there are consistent days of the week marked with an “X”.  From week to week, those “X”’s are there.

Those “X”’s are a reminder to me that those are my days to be home, and not to schedule something on those days.  If someone asks me to do something on those days, then the answer is that I cannot because I have plans. My plans to be home are every bit as valuable as external plans, and in terms of nourishing a rich family life and connectedness, probably even more valuable.

Where are the “X”’s on your calendar as you are planning for fall?

Blessings,

Carrie

Simplicity Monday: Get Organized!

This month, I am enjoying being with Master Waldorf teacher Lisa Boisvert Mackenzie  over at Celebrating the Rhythm of Life’s “Sketch It Out” planning session for back to school.   Lisa serves on the Board of Directors of Lifeways of North America and also holds a position on the Birth Through Three Task Force for the Waldorf Early Childhood Association of North America.  You can see more about Lisa here:  http://www.celebratetherhythmoflife.com/p/about.html Continue reading

Simplicity Monday: Too Much

Are we building our families on the four pillars of “too much”:  too much stuff, too many choices, too much information, and too fast? I believe that we are.  But I also believe that we don’t mean to be.  I know it for a fact, and I’ve seen it many times, that parents can bring fresh inspiration and attention to the flow of family life. – Simplicity Parenting, Kim John Payne with Lisa Ross, page XI, Introduction

I think the most well-meaning and loving parents can get caught up in this.  This year, as many of my readers know, was a difficult one and has been a real wake-up call to me to cut my life, our family’s life, down to the things and the people that I hold most dear, the people and things that nourish us as a family.  It is liberating, it is freeing, it is rejuvenating.

I think many parents actually have an easier time with going through material things and getting rid of and simplifying in that area.  However, when it comes to “too many choices, too much information and too fast”, it can be more difficult.    It also can mean hard choices.   One example of “too many choices”, is in activities.  Many of the parents I know whose children are involved in lots of activities are in them simply because  it sort of creeps up, for one, and for number two, we are so lucky in these times that we live in that there are many good activities!    At least, on the surface it can seem that many of these activities are “good”.

However, if we take a closer look, we see the displacement of the family life that “too many” activities cause, and also that many of the activities actually are “too fast” for the age.  I posted this link on The Parenting Passageway Facebook page, but here is a good example by a noted orthopedic surgeon in regards to children in competitive sports:  http://www.cleveland.com/dman/index.ssf/2013/02/noted_surgeon_dr_james_andrews.html

“Too much information” can also be difficult.  In an effort to not be the Continue reading

Simplicity Monday: Reducing Time In The Car

Americans, in most parts of the United States, do have a love affair with their automobiles.  After all, here you can drive eight hours or more and be in the same state, whereas in most places in Europe you can cross several different countries during that time!  The United States is very large indeed!

And our urban areas often sprawl.  I live in a sprawling Southern metropolitan area that covers about twenty counties.  We have just about everything and anything one would want to do – but it often comes at a high driving price.

I love this insight by Jack Petrash in his book, “ Covering Home: Lessons On The Art of Fathering from the Game of Baseball”:

I can still remember my parents packing the car for our summer vacation.  The trunk of our ‘52 Ford was filled to the capacity with suitcases and boxes of food.  The back seat belonged to my brother and me and we were told in no uncertain terms that we had better behave.  “You are going to be in the car for a long time.  Bring something to play with and don’t fight.  This will be a long trip.”

That “long trip” was a fifty-mile drive that we made once a year to stay at a little motel on a small lake on Long Island.  Nowadays, this distance is a daily commute.  Back then, during most months, I was not in the car for even two hours.”

Spending hours in a car is difficult on small children, and on us as well.  It is an area that can almost creep up on us as we realize the amount of time we have spent in the car in the past week, the past month, the past year.  My husband and I  were driving back from his parent’s home yesterday and we looked at each other and marveled how many hours we must have spent in a car together in the past 25 years – together, without children and together with children.

I think there are some simple ways to think about reducing time in the car, and the first step is to being aware and wanting to change that pattern for your children.  Spontaneous, outside play at home is far more important than being in a car.  As Jack Petrash writes, “If our children today are wired and wound up, it is often because they have been denied an outlet for their nervous energy.”  So if your children do not seem robust, but instead whiny, difficult, demanding, nervous and anxious – double check how much time you are in the car!

To reduce car time think of: Continue reading