The Rant: Development of the Whole Child, Part Two

I think one thing parents should be very aware of is how the development of movement takes place.   Movement of the ages before birth to age three is especially tied to relationships with other human beings.   I love how Rahima Baldwin Dancy writes about this time period:

This change in consciousness from infancy to three years involves waking up, in the sense that the participatory consciousness of the newborn gradually becomes replaced by a strong sense of self (just try opposing the will of a two-year-old!).  Before this strong sense of I can emerge, the child must first develop language, thinking and memory.

Penetration of the body, which culminates in walking, is a fundamental task of the baby’s first year.  Talking is a key task of the second year. And thinking and memory are areas of tremendous development in the third year.  -You Are Your Child’s First Teacher,  page 67.

If we think about this from a sheer physical, materialistic perspective, the brain starts to develop around the third week of gestation and continues to develop throughout the lifespan of the human being.  By age 6, the brain has about 90 percent of its adult volume.  The characteristic gyri and sulci of the brain develop between the weeks of gestational week eight and gestational week 36, with some  development extending into the post-natal period.   The human brain is an unfinished organ,  and Rudolf Steiner saw this and wrote about it — quite a remarkable idea for the early twentieth century, especially considering that the decade of the 1990’s was the decade labeled the “decade of the brain”.  What Steiner added to this thought about the unfinished brain being influenced and developed by movement and the development of the senses was that the soul and spirit within our bodies works on the brain itself, and that the environment works on our internal organs.  The limbs and dexterity of the limbs has much to do with the health of the child in  the physical, social, emotional and intellectual realms.

If one talks to pediatric therapists, they can outline a pretty set standard of  physical development that  they learned in school.  Not every child will go through this path of development, but the pieces children do accomplish is beneficial.  Every self-initiated movement and accomplishment  not only brings development of the body and the brain, but develops the will of the child and his or her own satisfaction.

The quality of movement is most important, and the physical path typically looks something like this, (as an example we will use the progression of an infant who is on his or her back): Continue reading