Christian Books To Read And Love

I write a Christian book review post about once a year.  The last post I did highlighting Christian books was here: http://theparentingpassageway.com/2011/08/10/three-books-of-importchristian-book-reviews/.  I would like to share a few books I have recently read and loved with you today!  Here we go!

Listening for the Heartbeat of God:  A Celtic Spirituality by J. Phillip Newell, the Warden of Spirituality for the Anglican diocese of Portsmouth.  One of the foundations of Christian life is the ability to achieve stillness and to listen.  This book is divided into sections on Listening for the Goodness (looking at the maligned Pelagius), Listening within Creation (Eriugena), Listening for God In All Things (the Carmina Gadelica), Listening with the Imagination (using the writings of George MacDonald),  Listening and Acting (George MacLeod), and Two Ways of Listening (The Apostles John and Peter).

Where God Happens:  Discovering Christ In One Another by Rowan Williams,  the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury.  Excellent look at the Desert Fathers and spiritual searching.

Abiding:  The Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lent Book 2013 which talks about abiding in body, abiding in mind, abiding through care, and abiding in relationships.  This books weaves together how we abide in God’s will through many stories – stories of St. Benedictine, stories of South Africa and Congo, Michael Ende’s Momo,   and St. Macrina.

Encountering The Mystery by His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.  I love this book, and have re-read it over and over.  Whilst specific to Orthodox Christianity, it also touches on issue that all Christians should be thinking about.  My copy has a lot of underlined parts in it and notes in the margin.  Highly, highly recommended. Continue reading

Simplicity Monday: Slow Sundays

One way to simplify your week is to use my “X” method on your calendar, (see this link http://theparentingpassageway.com/2013/07/29/simplicity-monday-days-of-xs/ )

and then to be sure to mark all of your Sundays as “Slow Sundays”.  Well, my day is Sunday, in large part due to our religion, but your day might be a Slow Friday or a Slow Saturday.

What this will look like will be up to you, but I suggest you follow the same rhythm each week.  For example, Continue reading

The Stranger

This is an amusing yet sobering  piece written by an anonymous person about the stranger living in his home growing up.  It is well- worth the short read.

The  Stranger

A   few years after I was born, my Dad met a stranger  who  was new to our small town. From the beginning, Dad was  fascinated with this enchanting newcomer and  soon invited him to live with our family. The  stranger  was quickly accepted and was around

from  then on.   As I grew up, I never questioned his place in my  family.  In my young mind, he had a special niche.

 

My  parents were complementary instructors: Mom  taught  me good from evil, and Dad taught me to obey.  But  the stranger… he was our storyteller. He would keep us spellbound for hours on end with adventures,  mysteries  and comedies.  If  I wanted to know anything about Continue reading

Freedom Versus Form

This has been a season where the theme of freedom versus form has been coming up repeatedly in my life, and as usual, I took this as a sign that I should write about this subject for my readers.

During one of the first few weeks on her Yahoo Group for homeschool planning called “Sketching It Out” that in homeschooling, Lisa Boisvert Mackenzie wrote something to the effect that we have a freedom so different than what is found in the Waldorf schools in bringing the impulses of Waldorf Education to the home, but then we have to create the form.  I have been mulling this thought around for several weeks now, where it has been germinating in my heart.  I  know from my own experiences in talking to  so many mothers and families that creating the form seems to be the most challenging part for families not just in homeschooling, but in parenting.

A small example in  parenting, for example,  Continue reading

Games Children (Should) Play

A large part of Waldorf Education includes an actual curriculum for games, that leads into sports in the middle school years.  There is a wonderful book called, “Child’s Play 1 &2” by Wil van Haren and Rudolf Kischnick that goes through what games correspond developmentally with what ages, and I thought I would detail some of this for those of you planning your homeschooling year, or even just for parents who don’t remember many childhood games or what ages they played certain games!

I love this quote from page 114 of this book:  True games are a source of health in which the child’s soul is repeatedly submerged, if he is not to miss our on the most valuable things.  However, this is not the only requirement.  In order to build up and play games and activities which are close to real life, it is important to have a thorough knowledge of the child’s essential core, on the one hand, and the moral value of the game relating to the particular stage of the child’s development, on the other.  The metamorphoses in the child’s development sometimes require one thing, sometimes another.  We should not lose sight of the child and his experiences of the world around him.  In themselves, games are worthless if they are not played at the right time and with the appropriate spiritual attitude.

From about ages four to seven, Continue reading